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Yes, exactly this, and less A in SFWA. Now, to be fair, there is no country whose history is more driven by technology than America. To visit the American History museum in Washington, DC is to visit the Museum of the History of Technology, and rightly so. Science Fiction's heartland is the USA, but the USA we have today is not the exceptional child of the frontier and Walt Whitman, but a world-flung culture that is absorbed and riffed upon as much as it absorbs and riffs.

There is always a reactionary backlash after a major revolution, but the Hugos kerfluffle is only a microcosm of the reaction to the Internet that created IS(I(S|L)/Daesh and the Tea Party. A symptom of this reaction is the insistence of framing any institution that is dissolving into a global perspective within the historical and cultural context it was created, and that includes treating outsiders to SF's heartland as "foreigners", whether they are welcome foreigners or despised immigrants.

There's a lesson to be learned here, and I think it's that to preserve a thing, you have to let it grow, and the desire to preserve a thing as it was, rather than what it is becoming, is a kind of violence, that can express itself in thought or word or deed. It's the myth of Saturn eating his children, and the genre community has been through it before: The community eventually allowed Fantasy, Horror, and all the other little genres into their camp and the community was enriched by it, even though SF was irreversibly altered by those very genres.

And I, as a Canadian that can totally pass as an American and even have the papers to prove it, fully welcome the centre not holding, things falling apart, and would like to see what Bethlehem this rough beast is slouching towards.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
asakiyume
Apr. 17th, 2015 11:01 pm (UTC)
It's the myth of Saturn eating his children,

I hadn't thought of fear (or rejection) of the future in terms of this metaphor, or of this myth in terms of this reality, but now that you say it, yes: how very apt.
barry_king
Apr. 18th, 2015 03:30 pm (UTC)
It is, isn't it? I first heard it reading Theogeny, and that's the impression I was left with from that text in particular.
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